Recent events

I’ve done several events around the country over the past few weeks, both in schools and libraries, some alone, others with Garry Parsons. Here are a few photos:

The two Grk covers and the Dragonsitter collage are drawn by children at Elson Primary in Gosport, where I spent World Book Day. The entire school – staff and pupils – were in costume, most of them dressed either as Grk or a dragon. It was wonderful.

All the other drawings are by Garry.

A map of London

I’ve always loved maps in books. Until now, only one of my own has had a map, and that was Bearkeeper. On the first page was a map of London in 1601, showing the locations of the Globe, the Bear Gardens, London Bridge, and a few other important places mentioned in the text.

London map 1601

The sixth Dragonsitter is also set in London, which gave me an excuse to ask my publishers to put a map in the front of that book too. I was delighted when they said yes, and Garry Parsons has drawn this lovely map:

London map today

Looking at these two maps side by side, you can see that in many ways London hasn’t changed very much over the past four hundred years. There is the river, and there is London Bridge, and there are the main roads spinning out of the centre and heading in every direction, bringing visitors in and out of the city.

Of course Shakespeare didn’t have the Shard, the London Eye, the Natural History Museum, or many of the locations featured in The Dragonsitter to the Rescue. But I like to imagine that he would have been able to find his way around the modern city fairly easily by sticking to the river and spotting a few landmarks which have survived the past four centuries.

The Dragonsitter to the Rescue

The sixth Dragonsitter will be published in the UK at the beginning of January.

I had a lot of fun writing this book, which is set in London, my home town.

In the story, Eddie and Emily come to the Big Smoke to stay with their father in a hotel. He thought he was just taking his two children to London for a special treat; he hadn’t expected them to bring the two dragons.

On a trip to the Natural History Museum, Arthur slips away from the others and disappears into the city.

The Natural History Museum

The rest of the story describes how Eddie and Emily get him back again. They travel around London, searching the parks, the museums, the monuments, the restaurants, and the streets, until they eventually find him in…

Oh, no, of course I’m not going to tell you that. You’ll have to read the book to find out where Arthur has been hiding, and how he spent his time in the city.

Here is the cover:

D6

Cutting the ribbon on a new library

This week I was invited to open a new school library. For any writer, or indeed anyone involved with books and storytelling, I can’t think of many more satisfying ways to spend an afternoon.

The school was Furness Primary in what used to be called Harlesden and is now probably part of Kensal Rise. Whatever you choose to call this particular area, it’s part of Brent, where the council has closed several libraries recently. So it was especially gratifying to witness the opening of a new library inside a school.

Before I cut the ribbon on the library, I did a couple of assemblies, first talking to the youngest kids, then the older ones, answering their questions and describing how my own love of books had been fanned by libraries when I was young. I talked about the books that I loved then, and still love now, many of which I would never have discovered if I hadn’t been able to wander slowly up and down the shelves of a library, plucking books that looked interesting, glancing at covers, scanning blurbs, reading a page or two, searching for the perfect book, the book that spoke to me.

Then I was handed a large pair of scissors.

The new library at Furness Primary

On the other side of the door was a freshly-painted, crisply-lit room stuffed with books. Cue cries of “oooh” and “look!” from the children who had been patiently waiting for me to snip the ribbon. They rushed around the library, eagerly hunting through the shelves, showing off their discoveries to one another, then pestering the teachers with questions, demanding to know when and how they could take books out of the library. Watching them, I thought about how much libraries like this foster a love of books and reading, and wished every school had a library as welcoming and well-stocked as this one.

Brody’s dragon

One of the nicest things about writing books is my post. Yes, of course, like anyone else, I get bank statements and notes from estate agents offering to sell my house and emails promising that I have won the State Lottery of a country that I’ve never visited, but I also get a lot of letters and emails from children who have read my books. My favourites are usually the ones that include a picture. I should post them here more often.

Here is a dragon that was sent to me by Brody, inspired by The Dragonsitter, which he has been reading.

Thank you, Brody, for sending me this brilliant dragon.

The dragon

 

October festivals

I’m looking forward to appearing at three festivals in October. I’ve never been to any of them before, but judging by their programmes, they all sound wonderful.

The first is Flipside on 3 and 4 October in Snape Maltings, near Aldeburgh in Suffolk.

general

Among the other children’s writers there are Chris Priestley, Emily Gravett, and James Dawson.

Next comes the Wimbledon Bookfest. I’m going to be there on Thursday 8 October as part of the schools programme.

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And thirdly is the Hungerford Literary Festival, where I’ll be speaking on Saturday 17 October.

Here are links to the websites where you can find out more about tickets, venues, and all the other fascinating writers and artists who will be appearing:

http://www.flipsidefestival.org

http://www.wimbledonbookfest.org

http://www.hungerfordlitfest.org

 

Wilderness

Earlier this August, I was one of several children’s authors performing at the Wilderness Festival. The festival was packed with twenty thousand people sampling everything from Bjork’s tunes to Moro’s lamb cutlets. Lucy Coats, Abi Elphinstone, Tamara MacFarlane and I were talking in the children’s area curated by Storystock. Over the course of the weekend, we each spoke about our books inside the big top, then did a panel discussion together.

A few photos below show the Storystock area, full of authors and pirates, and the lovely outpost of the Jaffe and Neale bookshop housed inside its own enormous tent… I wish I’d taken more (and better) photos, but I must have been always too busy eating those delicious lamb cutlets or chasing after my kids, trying to stop them getting completely lost among the other twenty thousand people.

Dragonsitter trouble

Here is the latest Dragonsitter book – which isn’t actually a new book at all, but a collection of two books, the fourth and fifth, The Dragonsitter’s Island and The Dragonsitter’s Party.

All for the bargain price of £6.99.

The previous Dragonsitter collection had three books, the first, second and third. Although Dragonsitter Trouble has only two, it does also have a selection of extras in the back pages: a quiz, a recipe, an invitation to a party, the introduction to Uncle Morton’s new book, and various other goodies.

Enjoy!

DT

 

Dubai

I’ve recently returned from a fabulous celebration of books in Dubai, the Emirates Airline Festival of Literature. It was a magnificent week of literary delights.

The festival has a great atmosphere; everyone wanders around, chatting to one another, browsing through piles of books in the shop, and talking about writing.

I had never been to Dubai before, and I enjoyed seeing that intriguing city, but the highlight of the festival was undoubtedly meeting so many interesting readers and writers. Here are two of them, Philip Ardagh and John Dougherty.

Alongside all these meetings and conversations, and going to various fascinating events, I did several sessions about my own books.

I led a creative writing group of twenty children and adults, who created some very imaginative stories. I travelled to the English College and talked to the Years 7s. I spoke on a panel with Klaus Flugge, publisher and owner of Andersen Press, and two legendary illustrators, Michael Foreman and Satoshi Kitamura. Thanks for @NotCoolHolmes for the photo:

And on the last day of the festival, I did a Dragonsitter event; thanks to @JanLaurent for taking this picture:

Alongside all these literary endeavours, I managed to find time to sneak out of the hotel and have a closer look at the tallest building in the world:

 

And I took a trip to the desert: if you look very closer at these white cars, you might be able to spot a few famous authors…

 

Also in the desert, I rode a camel:

 

And I got the opportunity to hold a falcon named Ziggy.

 

I did tell her about Ziggy the dragon in the Dragonsitter, but she wasn’t terribly interested.